Human papilloma virus

Human papilloma virus

Human papilloma virus

Human Papilloma Virus is a DNA-type virus capable of infecting humans. Infections only occur in the skin or mucous membranes. A lot of people infected with Human Papilloma virus have no physical symptoms. There are various different strains of Human Papilloma virus. There is a difference between the type that causes skin warts and the type which causes precancerous lesions on the cervix. Scientists have so far identified more than 100 different types of Human Papilloma virus strains.

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States and in many other parts of the world. HPV can be acquired through oral, vaginal or anal sexual intercourse with someone who has the virus. There are more than 35 different types of HPV which can be transmitted from one person to another through sexual intercourse.

The HPV which causes cutaneous warts, warts which occur on the skin, are not acquired through sexual intercourse. People can come into contact with this type of HPV through shaking hands, typing on public keyboards and turning door-knops. The virus enters the skin through a tiny scratch or wound which is present. This can then result in a wart forming. Sometimes, a person can be infected with the HPV, and only develop a wart months later. The HPV is spread from one person to another through direct skin to skin contact or through objects which have been used by the infected person, for example using a contaminated towel. One does not contract HPV from frogs or toads as many people believe.

A recent survey has stated that more than 2 thirds of Americans are infected with the HPV. At least half of all sexually active men and woman are infected with the HPV which can cause genital warts. A much smaller percentage of people are infected with the strains of HPV which can lead to cervical and other cancers.